Q&A with Vintage Trouble's Richard Danielson

Q&A with Vintage Trouble's Richard Danielson

We recently sat down with Vintage Trouble's dummer, Richard Danielson, (pictured to the left with his signature mustache) to learn more about the band. Check them out live in concert at The Northern Lights Theater Saturday, September 21 at 10 p.m.


Potwatomi:

How would you define Vintage Trouble's sound? What can people expect at the show?

Richard Danielson:

We like to use the word devolved, which is to say we have stripped our sound down to the bare essentials of just Bass, Drums, Guitar and Vocals. With this there is room for a certain breath in the music that is very attractive to us, as within that breath there is nothing to hide behind. So we're pretty naked and raw, which allows for space. A lot of times it's within this space that the magic happens. Being primarily a live band (even our record was recorded live) we live for that dynamic in the music.

 

As for what to expect live: this concept of live and being in the magic of moment parlays to our live shows, as we communicate with the audience as if they were a fifth band member. We encourage our audience to get involved, to feel and be felt, to shout and sing aloud, to dance and get out of their heads and into their bodies. Music is primal—it is from the guts and soul. As is the listening and dancing and participation of such. We like to say come dressy and leave messy.


PBC:

Where does Vintage Trouble gain their musical inspiration from?

Danielson:

We are four individuals coming from a lot of places musically, as we've all been in so many various musical situations. The culmination of these various influences is what gives us our own individual sound and identity. What we all agree on without any thought what-so-ever is good old dirty blues, old Soul and early rhythm and blues and early rock n roll. A really exciting time in music was late 50's - early 60's. Even a bit before and a bit after, but it was about an organic approach, a raw and very spirited approach. The likes of Howlin' Wolf, Ike and Tina Turner, Little Richard, Etta James, and even onto bands like Zeppelin.

 

There is so much great early music that will live through the laurels of time. Most of today's modern music stems from this early surge of music.

 

PBC:

You’ve gained popularity quickly after forming only a few years ago. Why do you think your music has resonated with people?

Danielson:

Perhaps live music is on the upswing again as a backlash to the very square computer generated music of today’s quantized scene. Live meaning music played by real musicians in real time. Rock ‘n’ roll will never die. It is too primal, it's an urge that we all feel inside. It tends to be best expressed live, be it recorded that way or in a performance type setting. 

 

PBC:

You’ve opened for The Who and The Rolling Stones … tell us about how that came about and the experience itself.

Danielson:

As for The Who: We had won an award in 2011 for Classic Rock's best new band. At that same time The Who was accepting an award for Qaudraphenia. So we came on their radar through this, as well as our being invited to work with Roger Daltry's teenage cancer trust. Perhaps those efforts, coupled with our incredible management team at McGhee Ent.,  put us on the short list when it came time to put the tour together.

 

Also, keep in mind that The Who originates as an rhythm and blues band. Maximum R&B is how it was described early on. So we really got on with Pete and Roger. They have been a huge support for us, and could not have been more encouraging and nice. True gentleman and still such hard working artists dedicated to what they are doing. The Who embody a spirit that cannot be taught. To open for them was a great learning experience.

 

PBC:

What are you listening to now?

Danielson:

On the bus we have a portable vinyl player, so we truly listen to old vinyl a lot. Mostly old soul, early rhythm and blues and rock ‘n’ roll. We do listen to new stuff from time to time, and are always looking for something new to inspire us, and there are so many great new bands today that are keeping the torch lit for live rock ‘n’ roll, soul, etc... but we still tend to lean towards older music.

 

PBC:

After your US tour wraps up this fall, what can fans expect to see from Vintage Trouble?

Danielson:

If this Fall is anything like the last few Falls, we will continue to play live. We also hope to take some time to work on a second record.